What positive and negative effects do monsoons have on India?

Although we often associate monsoons with harmful and destructive rain storms, the rains they bring are important for crop production. Summer monsoons in Asia are essential to bring enough water to the area to grow rice and other crops.

What are the positive and negative effects of monsoon?

Monsoons can have both negative and positive effects. Flooding caused by monsoon rains can destroy property and crops (SF Fig. … However, seasonal monsoon rains can also provide freshwater for drinking and crop irrigation.

What negative effects do monsoons have on India?

During summer monsoons, heavy rainfall can cause flooding. Powerful floodwaters can drown victims and damage buildings, leaving people without homes and vulnerable to the elements. During the 2014 summer monsoon in Pakistan and India, nearly 300 people lost their lives during landslides and home collapses.

What are the positive effects of a monsoon?

The negative effects of the monsoon winds are that huge amounts of precipitation fall, leading to large floods. A positive effect brings fertility to the soil, and contributes to a good yield in agriculture. Thanks to this, the nutrition of the population is safe.

THIS IS INTERESTING:  Is Hinduism banned in China?

What are some positive impacts related to the monsoons in India?

The Monsoon rains in India also replenish reservoirs and groundwater that helps in improving irrigation and also boosts hydropower production. Moreover, a good Monsoon season can reduce demand for subsidized diesel used for pumping water from wells, ground, ponds or rivers for irrigation.

What are 3 negative effects of monsoons?

Summer monsoons can bring heavy rains that destroy homes, damage infrastructure, wash away crops and destroy Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) infrastructure. During winter monsoons, dry weather can lead to drought and crop failures from lack of moisture.

What are the negative impacts of a monsoon?

The monsoon also has an impact upon human health. Two types of disease peak during the rainy season. They are diseases spread by mosquitoes and water borne infections. Mosquitoes breed in the ephemeral water bodies created by the rains and malaria and dengue fever cases increase.

How does the monsoon affect the climate of India?

Monsoons always blow from cold to warm regions. The summer monsoon and the winter monsoon determine the climate for most of India and Southeast Asia. The summer monsoon is associated with heavy rainfall. … The summer monsoon brings a humid climate and torrential rainfall to these areas.

What is impact of monsoon climate of India on Indian agriculture?

With around 55% of India’s arable land dependent on precipitation, the amount of rainfall during the current monsoon season could sway economic activity in the agriculture sector and industries linked to it. The shift in monsoon may entail grave consequences for India’s economy, food systems and people’s well-being.

THIS IS INTERESTING:  You asked: What are the Indian Constitution States?

How does monsoon affect Indian agriculture?

Monsoon is one of the most important seasons for farmers for a country so dependent on its agro-industry. Most of the Indian agricultural land is irrigated by the southwest monsoon. Crops such as wheat, rice, pulses, which are a staple in Indian diets, need heavy rainfalls to grow.

How does monsoon benefit India?

The monsoon delivers about 70% of India’s annual rainfall and determines the yield of rice, wheat, sugarcane and oilseeds, such as soybeans. … Monsoon rains replenish reservoirs and groundwater, allowing better irrigation and more hydropower output.

What causes monsoon in India?

The monsoon is caused by differing temperature trends over the land and ocean. … Moisture-laden winds from the Indian Ocean come to fill up the void, but because they can’t pass through the Himalayas region, they’re forced to rise. The gain in altitude of the clouds results in a drop in temperature, bringing about rain.

How does monsoon affect Indian economy?

Monsoons have a close linkage with India’s agricultural production. With around 50% of our total food output being summer crops, a delayed monsoon can hit the supply of foodgrains and other farm products such as vegetables and fruits and even impact food inflation.